Blog Archives

Online resources on infant and child bioarchaeology for teachers and students — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

There is an increasing number of online imaging resources and software useful for the bioarchaeology of infant and children. These resources are of particular use for teaching. Online Imaging Resources and Software Gwen Robbins Schug from Appalachian State University (US) … Continue reading

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Raising girls and boys in early China — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

Analysing 2500-year-old teeth has thrown open a window onto life and gender inequality during Bronze Age China. The University of Otago-led research has cast light on breastfeeding, weaning, evolving diets and the difference between what girls and boys were eating, … Continue reading

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Growing up different in Neolithic China – a case of dwarfism – Forbes article by Kristina Killgrove

“What we can say is that this individual would have likely had extra care needs where support from other community members was needed,” they write, “possibly both as the result of physical and/or mental disability, and that these would have … Continue reading

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Book review of Sally Crawford, Dawn M. Hadley & Gillian Shepherd (ed.). The Oxford handbook of the archaeology of childhood. 2018 — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

Recently published in Antiquity via Book review of Sally Crawford, Dawn M. Hadley & Gillian Shepherd (ed.). The Oxford handbook of the archaeology of childhood. 2018 — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

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Babies found with human skull helmets in ancient Ecuador — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

See Kristina Killgrove’s Forbes story on this new paper. Two infants have been interred with bone helmets (the skull cap) of other juveniles at the ritual complex of Salango in Ecuador dated to 100BC. This is the first evidence globally … Continue reading

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Mother and baby die during complicated birth in Neolithic China — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

A new study has found the first evidence in ancient China of a mother and newborn baby who died as the result of birth complications. Writing in the International Journal of Osteoarchaeology Zhao and colleagues describe a young woman buried … Continue reading

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Early Europeans bottle-fed babies with animal milk — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

Published in Nature News and Views The foods used to supplement or replace breast milk in infants’ diets in prehistoric times aren’t fully understood. The finding that ancient feeding vessels from Europe had residues of animal milk offers a clue. … Continue reading

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