“Children at Work” session at the EAAs

Yesterday, the ‘Children at Work’ session was held at the European Assocaition of Archaeologists meeting in Barcelona, organised by Melie Le Roy (Queen’s University, Belfast) and Caroline Polet (Universite libre de Bruxelles). The session involved papers ranging from the Neolithic to the 19th century and focused on various European countries as well as the US. The studies included those based on bioarchaeological research, fingerprint analysis and historical documents.

 

20180906_10303220180906_10305320180906_10311420180906_10313020180906_10315420180906_10321220180906_103227Melie and Caroline introductionPovilas

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Child Born 90,000 Years ago had Neanderthal Mother and Denisovan Father — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

Despite the breaking news about this ‘child’, this may have been an adult. Read more below. 

Breaking news about an astonishing find of a child is hitting international news. The paper presents the genome of ‘Denisova 11’, who is represented by a small bone fragment from Denisova Cave in Russia. The authors found that the individual was a girl of at least 13 years of age and has a Neanderthal mother […]

via Child Born 90,000 Years ago had Neanderthal Mother and Denisovan Father — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

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Moving Monuments – Commemorating Childhood at the National Memorial Arboretum 2 — Archaeodeath

At the National Memorial Arboretum, a second dimension of movement in memorials to children takes the form of the Edward’s Trust Memorial (for the first dimension, follow this link). This memorial is situated in a cluster of child-associated memories including the ‘Every Which Way’ (discussed in a previous blog) memorial commemorating evacuees of the Second World War. […]

via Moving Monuments – Commemorating Childhood at the National Memorial Arboretum 2 — Archaeodeath

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Moving Monuments – Commemorating Childhood at the National Memorial Arboretum 1 — Archaeodeath

Archaeologists frequently talk about monuments in relation to movement. Monuments can commemorate migrations, diasporas and dislocations from place for past living people, and the bodies of the dead (aka cenotaphs). Also, monuments and memorials can readily depict movement of people, animals and things in symbolic ways. They might require movement through their location and relationship […]

via Moving Monuments – Commemorating Childhood at the National Memorial Arboretum 1 — Archaeodeath

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Skull trauma in children indicates violent pre-Hispanic Canary Island societies — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood

There is a romanticised view that pre-Hispanic societies from the Canary Islands lived in a ‘paradise on earth’ without violence and conflict. However, recent work by anthropologists has shown that there is evidence for intentional trauma in adults from pre-Hispanic sites suggesting inter-personal violence. A recently published paper has found that the young were not […]

via Skull trauma in children indicates violent pre-Hispanic Canary Island societies — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

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New Book – Unearthing Childhood: Young lives in prehistory

A new book Unearthing childhood: Young lives in prehistory by Robin Derricourt is a unique and fully comprehensive survey of children across all of prehistory, from Australopithecines to the eve of civilisation. Robin discusses a range of themes, including birth and motherhood, family and development, food, clothing and adornment, learning crafts and skills, play and conflict. Unearthing childhood is essential reading for students, professionals, academics and general readers in archaeology, as well as those interested in childhood studies from historical, social science and other subject areas

– Manchester University Press.

Derricourt - Unearthing childhood cover image.jpg

 

Robin has written a blog post about his research for the MUP blog, and they have recently published a Q&A with him.

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Call for papers for 2019 SAA session “The Health and Welfare of Children in the Past”

A session on The Health and Welfare of Children in the Past will be held at the 2019 SAAs meeting at Albuquerque, New Mexico, on April 10-14th (session no: 4336). See here for more information on the conference. If interested in joining the session please contact the session chairs, Esme Hookway and Dr Kirsty Squires (Kirsty.Squires@staffs.ac.uk). The final SAA deadline for submission is the 6th of September.

Session Abstract

The study of children and childhood in the past has been of increasing interest to archaeologists over the past 20 years. Previously deemed to be invisible, theoretical and methodological advances mean the experiences, actions and physical remains of children are being studied to enrich our comprehension of past peoples. Exploring issues of health and welfare is a pathway to understanding not only the lives of children, but also, the world they inhabited. Changing social practices, political priorities, economic developments, environmental factors, and new technologies have all impacted on children’s health and welfare throughout the past. In turn, the life experiences of children shape the world they create as adults. This session will explore the archaeology and bioarchaeology of children from all time periods. Papers are invited which consider a variety of themes, including but not limited to, childhood health and disease, the care of children in the home, the welfare of children in the work place, and community and institutional roles in how and by whom children were cared for.

 

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