Free Osteoarchaeology Training for 14 – 25 year-olds

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Call for papers: EAA 2020 Budapest, Hungary – Session 281: The Archaeology of Baptism in Early Modern Europe

Please see below for a session being organised at the European Association of Archaeologists’ annual conference which is taking place in Budapest from 26-30 August 2020. The session organisers are Eileen Murphy and Colm Donnelly (Queen’s University Belfast), Mark Guillon (Université de Bordeaux) and Émilie Portat (Direction de l’archéologie, Chartres Métropole). The deadline for submission of contributions is 13 February and further details can be found at https://www.e-a-a.org/EAA2020/Home.aspx   If you have any queries about the session please email Eileen Murphy (Eileen.murphy@qub.ac.uk).

Session: #281

Theme & Session Format

Theme:
5. Theories and methods in archaeology: interactions between disciplines
Session format:
Regular session

Title & Content

Title:
The Archaeology of Baptism in Early Modern Europe
Content:
Baptism is a sacrament of critical importance within the main Christian denominations. Within the early Christian church it was considered essential to cleanse a person of Original Sin, the sin committed by Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden and subsequently inherited by humankind ever since. If baptism did not occur, however, then the sin remained in place and, as such, the unbaptized were condemned to Hell. A strong advocate for this position in the early church was St Augustine of Hippo (AD 354–430) who believed that all infants should be baptised as soon as possible after their birth in order to avoid potential eternal damnation should they die unbaptised. This harsh doctrine was later modified by moderate theologians within the Medieval church who advocated the existence of Limbo. By the late 16th century, however, baptism had become a contentious issue between the Catholic Church and the Reformed Churches, and also within Counter-Reformation Catholicism with certain theologians placing extreme importance on the teaching of St Augustine and his views on what happened to the souls of the unbaptised after death and their burial in unconsecrated ground.

It is the intention that this session will provide new insights and challenge existing paradigms on baptism across Early Modern Europe through the integration of theological, historical, architectural and archaeological perspectives. Papers are invited to cover issues such as burial rites and practices for the unbaptised (e.g. children’s burial grounds in Ireland), the material culture associated with baptism (e.g. religious objects and clothing), and the architectural expression of baptism (e.g. sanctuaires à répit [respite sanctuaries], shrines, and baptismal fonts).

Keywords:
Unbaptised, Unconsecrated ground, Sanctuaires à répit, Shrines, Counter-Reformation, Reformation
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Growing up different in Neolithic China – a case of dwarfism – Forbes article by Kristina Killgrove

“What we can say is that this individual would have likely had extra care needs where support from other community members was needed,” they write, “possibly both as the result of physical and/or mental disability, and that these would have presented early in life or were apparent at birth.” Forbes piece by Kristina Killgrove https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1879981719301342 %5B…%5D

via Growing up different in Neolithic China – a case of dwarfism – Forbes article by Kristina Killgrove — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

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Book review of Sally Crawford, Dawn M. Hadley & Gillian Shepherd (ed.). The Oxford handbook of the archaeology of childhood. 2018 — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

Recently published in Antiquity

via Book review of Sally Crawford, Dawn M. Hadley & Gillian Shepherd (ed.). The Oxford handbook of the archaeology of childhood. 2018 — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

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Babies found with human skull helmets in ancient Ecuador — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

See Kristina Killgrove’s Forbes story on this new paper. Two infants have been interred with bone helmets (the skull cap) of other juveniles at the ritual complex of Salango in Ecuador dated to 100BC. This is the first evidence globally for the manipulation of infant and child skulls in this way. The bones used for […]

via Babies found with human skull helmets in ancient Ecuador — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

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Mother and baby die during complicated birth in Neolithic China — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

A new study has found the first evidence in ancient China of a mother and newborn baby who died as the result of birth complications. Writing in the International Journal of Osteoarchaeology Zhao and colleagues describe a young woman buried with a newborn baby placed between her lower legs from Huigou, a Yangshao 仰韶文化(Neolithic) site […]

via Mother and baby die during complicated birth in Neolithic China — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

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Early Europeans bottle-fed babies with animal milk — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

Published in Nature News and Views The foods used to supplement or replace breast milk in infants’ diets in prehistoric times aren’t fully understood. The finding that ancient feeding vessels from Europe had residues of animal milk offers a clue. Small pottery vessels, sometimes with animal-like forms (Fig. 1), containing a spout through which liquid […]

via Early Europeans bottle-fed babies with animal milk — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

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