Raising girls and boys in early China — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

Analysing 2500-year-old teeth has thrown open a window onto life and gender inequality during Bronze Age China. The University of Otago-led research has cast light on breastfeeding, weaning, evolving diets and the difference between what girls and boys were eating, lead researcher Dr. Melanie Miller, a postdoctoral fellow in the University of Otago’s Department of […]

via Raising girls and boys in early China — The Bioarchaeology of Childhood | Sian Halcrow

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